Writer Tim Kinseth travelled to Belaga, an upriver district in Sarawak, and wrote an article in the Time magazine about how he felt that things were not quite as it used to be.

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Boy Beheaded by Father’s Enemy

by Jaxon S on July 17, 2009

in Uncategorized

A man beheaded his enemy’s five-year-old son in what The Star newspaper reported as a result of a feud between two families.

The incident took place in Lahad Datu in the east coast of Sabah, the Malaysian state in northern Borneo, on Wednesday.

The boy’s head was allegedly chopped off by his father’s enemy, who then placed it in a bucket before fleeing the scene with his wife and daughter at 4pm on Wednesday, the report says.

Lahad Datu acting district police chief Deputy Supt Lee Chee Yong said yesterday that police were looking for the 27-year-old suspect, who was living in the same house as the victim and his parents.

“Our investigations indicate that the parents of the boy and the suspect had a longstanding feud,” he said.

The boy’s parents were not at home during the incident.

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This is a sticky post and will remain sticky until midnight of July 21, the day the panel of experts will announce 28 of the 77 nominees for the Official Finalists voting stage.

I will also try to carry a live blogging of the announcement of the 28 finalists which will be made on July 21 at 12.07pm GMT or about 8.07pm Malaysian standard time.

The live blogging is already going live. Please feel free to participate in the discussion. [UPDATE: Live blogging session is now closed]

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WWF-Malaysia’s Borneo Species Programme team has captured images of Sumatran rhino, one of the world’s most endangered species.

Sumatran Rhino

The team said the pictures strengthen “the argument to sustainably manage the forests” in the Hearts of Borneo, where the pictures were taken.

“The future of rhinos in Borneo now depends on how seriously the forest reserves can be managed sustainably with effective monitoring carried out and supported by appropriate activities,” said Raymond Alfred, the senior manager of the programme.

Experts estimated that there are only about 30 rhinos left in the wild in Borneo, mostly in Sabah.

rhinoAlfred said that the rhinos’ key habitat in this forest may still or could be connected; especially between the Tabin Wildlife Reserve and Lower Kinabatangan River region.

“However, further conversion of the natural forests, especially those located adjacent to swamp-mangrove forests, into mono-plantation (particularly oil palm) would further eliminate the important corridor connecting these two key rhino areas,” he added.

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To the people of Borneo, being in Borneo is being somewhere. To many people around the world though, Borneo is a complete middle-of-nowhere — a place you can get lost into.

Which isn’t exactly a bad thing if travel to a remote location on the earth is what you have been looking for.

The Single Minded Women website recently posted an entry suggesting “middle-of-nowhere” places where you can go. It lists Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre in Sandakan, Sabah, as one of the places.

Proclaiming that nowhere is the new somewhere, writer Allison Neves also listed several other rewarding places to visit despite their remoteness, namely Mission Beach, Australia – The Sanctuary Yoga Retreat and Eco-Lodge; Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica – Lapa Rios Ecolodge; Amazon Basin, Peru – Cayman Lodge Amazonie; and Maputaland, South Africa – Rocktail Bay Lodge.

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The last time I checked, that was a week ago, Sipadan was in fifth position in the Island Category. It will have to be among the top 11 in the category to qualify for the “shortlisting stage”.

As this entry is written, the voting for the first round — to select 77 nominees from a pool of some 260 nominees — is just over.

Voting process for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

Voting process for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

After this, the panel of experts will go through the 77 nominees and will shortlist 28 of them for the Official Finalists voting stage.

The New Seven Wonders of Nature website no longer display the live ranking but I guess Sipadan did make it to the group of 77 nominees.

Sipadan’s fate is now in the hands of the panel of experts. By July 21 we should be able to know whether Sipadan is shortlisted for the final round of voting to choose The New Seven Wonders of Nature.

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Hanging...

Hanging...

It’s not for nothing that Sabah, the Malaysian state on Borneo island is promoted as a place where one can enjoy nature and adventure in its fine element from the mountain top to the bottom of the sea. If divers can enjoy one of the world’s finest, if not the finest, wall diving in Sipadan Island, a completely different adventure awaits extreme wall climbing enthusiasts at Mount Kinabalu, the highest mountain between the New Guineas and the Himalayas.

Vertical camp

Vertical camp

No one proclaims yet that Mount Kinabalu is among the world’s finest wall climbing destinations but looking at how these dare-devils conquer the mountain on its most treacherous route — what can be more treacherous than hanging from rocks or scaling the mountain walls at 90 degrees gradient — I couldn’t help but thinking that the mountain could be among the finest place for wall climbing.

Check out this amazing production, not to mention stunning photography, which documents of the whole Mount Kinbabalu wall climbing adventure.

[Photo credit: Borneo Dispatches]

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Leaders of six countries — Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor Leste — are gathering in Manado, in Sulawesi, Indonesia in a bid to save the region’s coral.

Amazon of the Ocean... Graphic by WWF

Amazon of the Ocean... Graphic by WWF

Dubbed the Coral Triangle Initiative, the meeting seeks to arrest the degradation of the region’s corals and marine heritage, which are under threats from global warming and destructive fishing methods.

Borneo, in particular the waters off its eastern coast, is an integral part of the WWF-led Coral Triangle initiative that covers 5.7 million sq kilometre area dubbed the “Amazon of the Ocean”.

The coral triangle, which houses 76 per cent of the world’s coral species and 50 per cent of the world’s reef fish species, is WWF’s top priority in its marine conservation.

Three coral-rich waters in Sabah in the northern tip of Borneo, are among areas in the Coral Triangle.

They are the Tun Mustapha Marine Management Area in Marudu Bay, Turtle Islands Protected Area off Sandakan and Tun Sakaran Marine Park off Semporna which houses world premier diving site and New Seven Wonders of Nature nominee, Sipadan Island.

WWF says the Coral Triangle “holds the richest concentration of iridescent corals, fish, crustaceans, mollusks and marine plants in the world”.

“Labyrinths of limestone reefs, extensive sea grass meadows and coastal mangrove forests attract sea turtles and giants of the sea such as humpback whales to feed, breed and rest in the rich and sheltered waters.”

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